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The U.S. Secret Service Updates Employment Policy Regarding Past Cannabis Use, Oregon State Audit Suggests Cannabis Laws Need an Overhaul, and Tennessee Bill Would Establish New Rules for Hemp-Derived Cannabinoids

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The U.S. Secret Service Updates Employment Policy Regarding Past Cannabis Use

The U.S. Secret Service (USSS) recently updated its employment policy to be more lenient toward prospective agents who have previously used cannabis. Before the change, the federal agency’s policy surrounding past marijuana use was based on age. Potential agents who last used cannabis when they were 24 or younger could apply with the USSS after abstaining for one year. For each subsequent year after age 24, the candidate’s period of ineligibility increased. Those who consumed cannabis from age 28 and beyond faced five years of ineligibility to apply. However, last month the USSS updated this policy so that individuals of any age could apply after abstaining from cannabis use for only one year. 

Oregon State Audit Suggests Cannabis Laws Need an Overhaul

On Friday, the Oregon Liquor and Control Commission (OLCC) released the results of an audit of the state’s cannabis laws. The audit found that Oregon’s cannabis laws need a general overhaul. When voters first passed legalization in the state, the primary focus of the regulations was preventing interference from federal law enforcement. However, as the state was one of the first to pass recreational cannabis legalization, its legal market is now worth an estimated $1 billion annually and in need of an updated regulatory structure. The OLCC also advised state officials to prepare for national legalization and the ability to export cannabis to other states. This necessitates updated track-and-trace requirements as well as security regulations, which would lessen the burden on individual businesses. The audit also points out that the state should track demographic information to measure the efficacy of social equity initiatives. 

Tennessee Bill Would Establish New Rules for Hemp-Derived Cannabinoids 

Recent legislation in Tennessee would establish new regulations for retailers who sell hemp-derived cannabinoids. Senate Bill 378 was sent to Republican Governor Bill Lee, and the expectation is that he will sign it into law. Once passed, the measure would require that any products made from hemp-derived cannabinoids undergo lab testing and adhere to specific rules for labeling. The products must be sold in child-resistant packaging. Retail locations that wish to sell hemp-derived cannabinoid products will need to be licensed through the state by January 1st, 2024. Only consumers aged 21 or older will be able to legally purchase these products. While marijuana remains illegal in Tennessee, state officials recognize the need to regulate this market after hemp-derived products were federally legalized by the 2018 Farm Bill.